Seminar on Disruptive innovation and Nokia at Francisco Marroquin University in Guatemala

Today I had the opportunity to present some preliminary research to professors at Francisco Marroquin University (UFM). Among other things, UFM has a great reputation for its openness and interest in evolutionary perspectives on markets.

The seminar concerned the decline of Nokia and its implications for theory development. The overall argument I brought forward is related to the introduction of smartphones and how Nokia’s struggle in recent years can be explained. Preliminary findings suggest that while smartphones were highly appreciated by consumers, operators were more skeptical as it would erode their position in the supply chain. Nokia was therefore put in an awkward position where they had to cater to demands of operators. Apple, on the other hand, was an entrant firm and could therefore push the introduction of smartphones. As consumers adopted it quickly, operators were now progressively forced to also do so, leaving Nokia behind.

The main theoretical implication of these findings is related to the observation that whether a technology is disruptive or not depends on which actor that is concerned. In the case of smartphones, it was disruptive to operators, but sustaining to consumers. Such heterogeneity in terms of incentives has largely been overlooked by existing theory on the topic.

The following discussion concerned Nokia’s decline and how markets can be conceptualized from an Austrian perspective. Strategic implications for universities dealing with the ongoing shift to online education were also covered.

Having heard that UFM has a unique culture, I was nevertheless overwhelmed by the hospitality, intellectual curiosity and friendly atmosphere surrounding the seminar. UFM is a fantastic institution.

For more information, see the slides below:
Nokia’s Decline and disruptive technologies

UFM
Francisco Marroquin University

2 thoughts on “Seminar on Disruptive innovation and Nokia at Francisco Marroquin University in Guatemala

  1. Dear Christian,

    It’s really a pity I missed the talk only for few days. I saw the slideshare, and is really interesting. No mentions about Android. I was wondering about your opinion of the role of Android in this disruptive innovation in smartphones market. I hope we will have the opportunity to meet and chat today here at UFM in Guatemala.

    Best regards,

    Manuel

  2. Manuel,
    Great to meet you today, and thanks for a good comment. It is pretty clear why Nokia was not able to come up with smartphones. It is, however, less obvious why they did not adopt Android quickly. Had they done so they could have been in Samsung’s position as a fast follower. Internal rigidities and a culture of complacency are potential explanations that the reviewed material below hint at.

    All the best, Christian

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